Finding Your Audition Process

with Kesha Monk

Do you have a process for your auditions? Anne and special guest co-host Kesha Monk share the tips and tricks that make their auditions stand out. Knowing what’s behind the words is just as important as setting the scene or creating your character. Anne Gangoogle it! Like anything else, you get out of it what you put into it. This episode will help make your next audition worth the listen.



Takeaways

Quick Concepts from Today’s Episode:

  1. Everyone has a different process for auditions, depending on the instructions given

  2. If you’re rushing to put out too many auditions, you can sometimes fall into the trap of “reading” the script without developing the scene

  3. Spend some time before you record an audition to research the product

  4. Spending more time preparing for auditions can help increase your booking rate

  5. For commercial auditions, find out as much as you can about the product, google it, look up recent commercials from that company on YouTube to understand the sound or trends in the videos

  6. Research the target audience of the advertisement. Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter can also help by telling you what other people are saying about the product 

  7. When given a celebrity reference, study their tone, cadences, and use of body, then channel that person during your audition. Don’t do an impersonation unless asked

  8. Use your body and hands when reading copy. It helps bring authenticity to your read.

  9. If you’re standing still behind the mic and not moving it can throw off your timing and sound “read”

  10. Give the casting director what they’re asking for, but don’t get lost in the specs. You can only be you

  11. As human beings, we connect to one another. Bring this to your auditions

  12. Before you submit to an agency, check out their roster and look for how you might fill a need. If someone is similar, do not submit 

  13. Find smaller agencies and production houses that don’t yet have someone with your voice

  14. Giving two takes on short copy, with different spins can help with your booking. If you can’t give a different authentic take, only submit one take

  15. A slate (or lack thereof) can make or break if a casting director will listen to the rest of your audition


Referenced in this Episode

Direct links to things we brought up ++


KESHA
VOICEOVER
LIVE ANNOUNCER
Read what goes on in the head of the casting director on Anne’s blog
Recorded on ipDTL

Transcript

>> It’s time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry’s top talent today. Rock your business like a boss, a VO BOSS! Now let’s welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza.

Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I’m your host, Anne Ganguzza, along with my really wonderful friend and amazing special guest co-host, Miss Kesha Monk.

Kesha: Bonjour! How you doin’?

Anne: Oh bonjour!

[both laugh]

Anne: She is a multi-talented girl. [laughs] For sure. And [laughs] I just love discovering these new little tidbits about you, Kesha. You never, you never cease to amaze me, that is for sure.

Kesha: I’m a lot of work, I really am. I truly am, trust me.

Anne: [laughs] “I’m a lot of work!”

Kesha: I am. [laughs]

Anne: [laughs] You know, Kesha, it’s just after the holidays, and stuff is starting to pick up again. And I’ve got a boatload of auditions in my inbox.

Kesha: Yes. That’s a good thing.

Anne: From my agents.

Kesha: That’s a good thing.

Anne: It is a good thing. And so I thought it might be kind of cool to discuss auditioning, the process.

Kesha: I’m pretty good at that.

Anne: [laughs]

Kesha: Pretty good.

Anne: I’d love to hear what your process — because you and I probably audition — I mean, I think we both audition for commercials, and anything that our agents give out to us, and video games, and that sort of thing. You have a different avenue though that you work in that I don’t, which is like promo, live announce, that sort of thing. You’re getting some probably different auditions than me. I’d love to hear like your process, and maybe by discussing our processes together, we might come up with some tips and tricks for our listeners out there.

Kesha: That’d be great. That’d be great. I just hope I don’t turn them off, because I, I am a lot of work. Like I just, I never pick up copy and just read it. We’ll get into it.

Anne: Well, you know, I think that that is actually a good thing, because I personally think that so many of us just get the audition, and we’re trying to put out as many auditions as possible because we want to get the gig. And when we do that, we just run into the booth, and then we read. Do you know what I mean? Our intention is not to — I mean, we might do a big set-up. We say “ok, so if they want like conversational, I’m gonna be Anne, and I’m gonna talk to my friend.” And I think we do a bunch of setup, but we don’t really investigate maybe the product that we’re talking about, and we don’t necessarily, I’m gonna say, develop the scene enough so that we’re continually having a conversation or a reaction or an emotion to something.

Kesha: Right.

Anne: That’s where I think spending a little more time before you actually roll out the audition, to research the product, I think that’s an absolute great way to get started. For me, I do a lot of corporate narrations.

Kesha: Yeah.

Anne: And I think investigating who the company is and what their product is, whether it’s for corporate narration or commercial, that, number one, can really help you to get a backstory and some information about that product that you can bring to light through your voice.

Kesha: Absolutely. And it will help with your overall delivery if you really, truly know what you are voicing, you know? So yeah, I —

Anne: So what’s your process? Tell me. Tell me, how do you go about, what do you do?

Kesha: Girl.

Anne: [laughs]

Kesha: It sounds like a lot. But I absolutely cannot — let me first start by saying if you’re doing voiceover, and you get an audition, and you, you know, and you print out your script or whatever, and you jump right in the booth, for whatever reason, maybe for time constraint, you know — you know, it’s due at 6:00, it’s 3:00. You want to kind of get — I get it. I get it. I’ve done that before.

Anne: Oh, me too.

Kesha: But what I’ve started to realize is that I really wasn’t booking as much as I should have been if I just would have put a little bit more effort —

Anne: Yeah.

Kesha: — into preparing for the audition. So just to kind of walk you through, give you the visual. Let’s say for instance, let’s say for instance I get an audition for McDonald’s, ok? Everybody knows McDonald’s, you know, but I’m a vegan, so I — I’m not really a vegan. I’m just, I’m giving you the scenario here. Let’s just say I’m a vegan, and McDonald’s just isn’t my thing. I’ve seen the commercials, you know I’ve grown up with McDonald’s. They’ve been around for 1000 years. I kind of know the brand. But my goal is to want to make you, Anne, run out to McDonald’s and get that burger, not because of all the great optics that, you know, that come with the McDonald’s commercial, have you licking your lips. But that voice is really the thing that connects you with whoever is watching the commercial, right?

Anne: Yep, yep.

Kesha: So I, I’ll go to YouTube, you know, YouTube University. They have the answer for everything. And not only will I educate —

Anne: [laughs] Google!

Kesha: Right, exactly. Hello!

Anne: Anne Gangoogle it. That’s what I always say.

Kesha: Anne Gangoogle is your best friend, trust me when I tell you, ok? So I, absolutely. So you know, I’ll research, not only will I research the product — maybe the commercial is about a quarter pounder with cheese. Not only will I research the product, but I’ll —

Anne: Now I’m hungry.

Kesha: I know, right? But I’ll pull up a couple of, you know, recent commercials just to kind of understand the trend maybe.

Anne: Yes.

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